kamagra flavored

Passive Solar – Simple Engineering? Hardly!

Passive Solar Concept

Passive solar design for residential dwellings is appears rather straightforward.  First, design an overhang that controls seasonal UV (Ultra-violet – the portion of visible light that contains heat) light penetration through a building aperture – usually fenestration (a window or a door).  The idea is to construct the overhang such that UV light penetrates deep into the dwelling in winter but is blocked out during the summer.  Second, install some form of mass (concrete, fluid, etc.) in the floor and the walls that can store the heat generated during the day.  Then, sit back and let convection and conduction perform the miracle of thermal dynamics.  All this sounds so simple, so why not do it on every house?  The answer is that it isn’t simple – we are dealing with a moving heat source (the sun), variations in outdoor temperature (climate), weather patterns (we need sunny days to make this work) and real estate assets (which direction are my views).  For example, here in sunny Colorado where we have 300 days of sunshine, a temperate climate, and a high altitude that allows intense UV rays to reach our altitude – but our views in Denver and the front range are typically west.  Well, our solar source in the summer is at its lowest point in the afternoon and producing the highest heat levels of the day.  The overhang required to shade any west facing fenestration would be nearly 20′ – you would essentially need a west facing wrap around porch with a concrete surface.  So, once again, we are faced with an architectural dilemma.  We need to capture the views that the property offers in order to enhance the value of the home.  Yet, we need to engineer systems for the dwelling that mesh with the architecture and reduce the use of fossil fuel burning devices necessary for controlling the indoor climate.  In conclusion, just like daylighting, it may prove more effective to reduce fenestration and mass absorbing materials and install local power generating elements such as solar and wind.      

This is the notion of Ecotecture – blend all the architectural elements, engineering systems, and the natural environment into one entity.  Too many people buy into one notion of reducing our carbon footprint without fully understanding the ramifications.  We, as stewards of the earth, must first educate ourselves properly and then enact and build dwellings that are organic and smart.  They must be analyzed for local conditions, designed to produce the smallest carbon footprint and then made beautiful to make others take note of Ecotecture.