Green Architecture and Green Home Plans

Contemporary Ecotecture

Classically Styled Ecotecture

On my website, www.ecotecturestudios.com, I have plans that I have created for clients and speculative construction over the last twelve years.  Some of these plans are larger, but they are all based on the “Not so Big House” concept proposed by Ms. Susanka.  The designs have only rooms you need and use on a regular basis – very few have formal living rooms and a few don’t have formal dining rooms.  The plans on my website for purchase were built Green- recycled waste, recycled lumber materials, advanced framing techniques, low-e glazing on windows, high wall & attic insulation (R-26 & R-50 respectively), high efficiency mechanical equipment & appliances, and the use of materials with low embodied energy numbers.  So, you don’t have to build a contemporary, Ecotecture style home to be Green.  However, it is very hard to produce a neutral carbon footprint and reduce the amount of materials involved in the construction.  The ’transitional’ homes I propose would be somewhat more contemporary in style but introduce some of the Ecotecture elements I have described on earlier posts – earth insulation, some living roofs, PV & wind power generation, and an emphasis on using recycled materials and materials with a low embodied energy.  This transitional home would have sustainable elements and perhaps obtain a neutral carbon footprint, but the elements wouldn’t be integrated into the architecture.  They would be visible and appear to be Greenband-aids or additive to the architecture.  My ‘sustainable’ home proposal is true Ecotecture – blend the ’house’ with the renewable energy elements, the natural surroundings and make the home feel like it is contiguous with nature.  You can neither ’camoflague’ the home nor make it invisible.  The home needs to be a home – the old saying form follows function.  The design or appearance (form) should appear to be a dwelling that is a sustainable dwelling (function).  My vision for these homes is a spectacular blend of all the elements I have discussed in my blog posts:

Use materials that do not require large amounts of energy to produce – materials with low embodied energy numbers (EE) Photovoltaic Panels (Solar Panels, PV’s) being used to shade and control weather (awnings, pergolas, shed roofs, etc.) and produce electricity Wind turbines used as architectural elements and boldly displayed Living roofs that both insulate and provide a raised garden with spectacular views Using the earth to insulate large portions of the home rooms & garages that do not require fenestration can be buried and graded to be part of the landscape bring earth insulation to the bottom of wall fenestration & plant flower gardens so it feels like European flower boxes current construction places your landscaping 3′-4′ below your window and therefore unseen from the interior Installation of geothermal heat pumps that use the earth’s heat deep below the surface to heat and cool the dwelling Apply daylighting and passive solar techniques when feasible and economical Use low energy consuming appliances & mechanical equipment that can be run off the electricity generated on-site  Install LED lamps for electrical lighting and smart control systems to reduce energy consumption Use gray water systems that recycle sink & shower water to be used in toilets Install rain barrels and large cisterns to store water for landscaping irrigation Make the architecture appear to be an element of the earth – the dwelling and nature produce a symbiotic relationship (the dwelling resides upon the earth and interacts in such a way that it enhances the survival of the planet) The architecture is awe inspiring – it is beautiful, new, intriguing, an engineering masterpiece and ultimately inspiring for others to construct the same style home

I believe Ecotecture, like modernism, prarie style, colonial, organic architecture, etc., will eventually become a noted architectural style.  It will be the first style, however, whose form will be driven by the function to be a sustainable steward of the earth.

Integrating Wind Turbines into Green Homes

Artistan Wind Turbine

The war on ‘Green means ugly’ has been brought to the wind generation front!  Plus, the U.S. Federal Tax Credit foots 30% of the cost with no cap!  A multitude of companies offer products that are both elegant and excellent sources of wind power.    These wind turbines can be integrated into either new designs or used for Green renovations on existing buildings.  The Swedish-built Energy Ball is a beautiful example of an artisan wind generator.  It is availabe in .5kW model that measures 43″ in diameter and a 2.5kW model that measures 78″.  Another great example is the Swift rotary turbine that offers 1.5kW’s of power.  Although the rotary design is not as elegant as the Energy Ball, this turbine is more elegant than a standard rotatry turbine.  The ultimate marriage of contemporary, sustainable designs and wind generation is exemplified by the Aerotecture International  products.  This is the type of integration of Green concepts into architecture that I describe on my Ecotecture Studios sustainablity page.  Green can be in harmony with beautiful homes!